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ATA Carnet Post-Brexit Guidance

Brexit and the ATA Carnet Brexit, the departure of the United Kingdom (UK) from the European Union (EU), has been in the news for years now, and finally in the new year, it has come to pass. For concerned logistics service providers and shippers, this change will not have a significant impact on US ATA Carnet users who export to both the UK and the EU.  US ATA Carnet users who send goods on ATA Carnet to multiple countries are accustomed to the need for white counterfoils for every country entrance and exit. That will be the basic process now that the UK is no longer a member of the EU. US ATA Carnet users simply need to make sure they have enough white counterfoils for each time they exit the UK and travel to the EU or vice versa. If you have ever taken goods on an ATA Carnet to member countries in the EU and have had to enter Switzerland (a non-EU country) then you are already a pro at clearing ATA Carnets between the non-EU and EU countries. Official USCIB Guidance to Exporters On December 23rd the U.S. Council for International Business (USCIB) provided the following guidance, “January 1, 2021, the UK will no longer be an EU member and should be treated as an independent country. A set of white counterfoils and vouchers will be necessary for each ATA Carnet visit to the UK. Specific questions or assistance on U.S. ATA Carnets with regards to this announcement should be directed to our Carnet Service Team at 1.800.Carnets (1.800.227.6387) or by email at Carnets@RoanokeGroup.com. In addition, as of January 1, 2021, the port of Dover, Eurotunnel, and Holyhead cannot process ATA Carnets. Here are links to customs offices in the UK where ATA Carnets, will be processed: Guidance: Attending an inland border facility Guidance: Moving goods through the Port of Dover and Eurotunnel with an ATA Carnet from 1 January 2021 For traffic over the land boundary between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland, the normal hours of opening are 09.00 – 17.00 hours. ATA Carnets entering or leaving the United Kingdom via Northern Ireland should be endorsed in Northern Ireland. Further information on the relevant aspects of the ATA Carnet in the UK can be found here: Guidance: ATA Carnet.” Why Use the ATA Carnet? The…
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Customs Bond Resources for the Trade Wars

Resources to Help Brokers Battle the Trade War While it’s no longer front page news fodder the tariff-centered trade wars continue. Change – if not outright volatility – continues to be an understatement as it relates to tariffs on goods imported to into the United States these days. Unfortunately businesses who have import activities and the customs brokers who assist them are caught in the middle, and they can become casualties of the ongoing trade wars. While U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is publishing plenty of resources, the dedicated people on the Customs Bond team at Roanoke are here to help you understand and adjust to the complications that the changing tariff rates are creating for you and your clients. To help Logistics Service Providers and the trade community, we’ve compiled The One-Page Guide to Customs Bond Sufficiency. It’s a multimedia resource page on our website that contains everything you need to know to keep your bonds sufficient and ensure that CBP required increases and regular renewals go as smoothly as possible. And if you have questions that are not addressed, please let us know. We will do whatever we can to assist! The One-Page Guide to Bond Sufficiency contains: Case Study on Special Tariffs and Bond Amount Calculations [Video] How to Process a CBP Bond Insufficiency Notice [Download] Bond Amount Calculations Contact Information to Get Help Visit the Page Now! Understand the Real Risk of Insufficiency This page also includes a video case study called, “Possible Effects of Special Tariffs on Bond Amount Calculations” for deeper insights and understanding of the issues at hand. Bond amount calculation looks like a pretty straightforward topic on its surface, but there are hidden pitfalls. The video walks you through understanding how stacking liability works, how it can endanger your clients’ bonds and ability to import, and it lays it out in terms that will help you explain the situation to the importer. When the importer understands the risks, they can work with you to project out their duties, taxes, and fees more accurately and protect their bond status. Click Here to View If there is something you see that needs further clarification. Please call us. If you want to better understand your specific situation, then please call us. If you need to see something that’s not included, then once again —…
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Take eBond to the Next Level – Issue Bonds in Your ABI

eBond is the fastest customs bond filing system ever, and it’s about to be even faster and easier. The Road to eBond Customs bonds used to be issued on typewriters. Across the country entry writers for customs brokers would hammer out importer information onto green, pink, and yellow sheets of carbon paper, and these paper pages were delivered by messenger or mail to the CBP office at the local port. There the bonds waited for their Customs Control Number stamp and delivery back to the broker or agent. Then in the 2000’s, the bond filing process went digital. Processing was centralized in Indianapolis at the NFC Revenue Div Bond Team. PDF bond copies were delivered by email, and automated notices were watched for and filed away. Wait times on filings decreased to days, and terminations could be done in a week. Finally there came eBond, an online filing method hooked directly into CBP’s ACE system. Access to bond provider systems like our FastBond™ platform allowed customs brokers to file bonds electronically with response times measured in seconds. And now we’ve found a way to make the filing even faster and easier. What’s faster than seconds spent filing over FastBond™? Instant filing directly from your own ABI software. eBond Integration Roanoke has worked with a number of the most prominent ABI vendors on the market today to create integrations with FastBond™. Integrating these systems eliminates the need for duplicating data entry.  You can issue a single transaction bond with the press of a button without leaving your ABI software. No extra login. No time spent in another system. That’s fast and easy. Roanoke currently has FastBond™ integrations with: BluJay Solutions CargoWise GTKonnect SmartBorder XTHETA If you are ready to streamline the bond issuance process and integrate your ABI software with FastBond™, please complete our brief online form. If your ABI vendor is not on our current integration list, we encourage you to reach out to them and let them know that you would like them to build a connection with us. It’s important that this conversation starts with you, the ABI customer. Creating the initial integration is a big benefit to you, but to the ABI vendor it is an expense in time and resources. Your ABI vendor needs to know that having eBond integration with your FastBond™ issuance system is…
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How to Create a CyberSmart Password

CREATING A PASSWORD This is the final blog post in our series highlighting the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency efforts on the “Do Your Part – #BeCyberSmart” campaign for October, the National Cybersecurity Awareness Month. The cyber awareness topic for today is How to Create a CyberSmart Password. Today’s 8 tips on creating a password come courtesy of the National Cybersecurity Alliance and The Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency. We are sharing this valuable information to the trade community in order to help raise industry awareness and hopefully prevent cyber incidents. Creating a strong password is an essential step to protecting yourself online. Using long and complex passwords is one of the easiest ways to defend yourself from cybercrime. No citizen is immune to cyber risk, but #BeCyberSmart and you can minimize your chances of an incident. SIMPLE TIPS: Creating a strong password is easier than you think. Follow these simple tips to shake up your password protocol: Use a long passphrase. According to NIST guidance, you should consider using the longest password or passphrase permissible. For example, you can use a passphrase such as a news headline or even the title of the last book you read. Then add in some punctuation and Don’t make passwords easy to guess. Do not include personal information in your password such as your name or pets’ names. This information is often easy to find on social media, making it easier for cybercriminals to hack your accounts. Avoid using common words in your passwords. Substitute letters with numbers and punctuation marks or symbols. For example, @ can replace the letter “A” and an exclamation point (!) can replace the letters “I” or “L.” Get creative. Use phonetic replacements, such as “PH” instead of “F”. Or make deliberate, but obvious misspellings, such as “enjin” instead of “engine.” Keep your passwords on the down-low. Don’t tell anyone your passwords and watch for attackers trying to trick you into revealing your passwords through email or calls. Every time you share or reuse a password, it chips away at your security by opening up more avenues in which it could be misused or stolen. Unique account, unique password. Having different passwords for various accounts helps prevent cyber criminals from gaining access to these accounts and protect you in the event of a…
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7 Cyber Smart Tips to Avoid Phishing Scams

PHISHING Today we continue our blog series highlighting the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency efforts on the “Do Your Part – #BeCyberSmart” campaign for October, the National Cybersecurity Awareness Month. The cyber awareness topic for today is Phishing. Read on to learn 7 tips to protect your company from Phishing attacks. Our goal in sharing this information is to help raise industry awareness. Today’s tips for the how to protect your company from phishing attacks come courtesy of the National Cybersecurity Alliance and The Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency. Phishing attacks use email or malicious websites to infect your machine with malware and viruses in order to collect personal and financial information. Cybercriminals attempt to lure users to click on a link or open an attachment that infects their computers, creating vulnerability to attacks. Phishing emails may appear to come from a real financial institution, e- commerce site, government agency, or any other service, business, or individual. The email may also request personal information such as account numbers, passwords, or Social Security numbers. When users respond with the information or click on a link, attackers use it to access users’ accounts. HOW CRIMINALS LURE YOU IN The following messages from the Federal Trade Commission’s OnGuardOnline are examples of what attackers may email or text when phishing for sensitive information: “We suspect an unauthorized transaction on your To ensure that your account is not compromised, please click the link below, and confirm your identity.” “During our regular verification of accounts, we couldn’t verify your Please click here to update and verify your information.” “Our records indicate that your account was overcharged. You must call us within 7 days to receive your refund.” SIMPLE TIPS: Play hard to get with strangers. Links in email and online posts are often the way cybercriminals compromise your computer. If you’re unsure who an email is from—even if the details appear accurate—do not respond, and do not click on any links or attachments found in that email. Be cautious of generic greetings such as “Hello Bank Customer,” as these are often signs of phishing If you are concerned about the legitimacy of an email, call the company directly. Think before you act. Be wary of communications that implore you to act immediately. Many phishing emails attempt to create a sense of…
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Introducing CARGO INSURANCE e-SSENTIALS!

Cargo Insurance Fundamentals Explained for Logistics Service Providers  We’re thrilled to release the *NEW* e-Book titled, CARGO INSURANCE e-SSENTIALS.  This e-Book was developed to serve as a valuable resource and reference document for Logistics Service Providers and those involved in Supply Chain Logistics. This is the first resource planned in a series of insurance and surety related reference documents. This electronic document will be updated as necessary with new or expanded information related to Cargo Insurance and it how the coverages function in the real world. The goal of this CARGO INSURANCE e-SSENTIALS is to help Logistics Service Providers explain potentially complex insurance topics in more straightforward terms to their cargo owner clients. The e-Book addresses the different facets of the cargo insurance policy and why cargo owners need this coverage.   Listed below is the table of contents for CARGO INSURANCE e-SSENTIALS. What is Cargo Insurance? Carriers Obligation to Pay Coverage Types Common Exclusions Duration of Coverage Clauses Policy Limits Insured Value and Premium Special Valuations Claims Glossary   Functionality CARGO INSURANCE e-SSENTIALS is designed to give you information and insights on what you want to know, when you want to know it. The table of contents (above) is displayed on the side panel of each page enabling you to jump to the topic of your choice. In addition, a glossary is included in the e-Book that provides the definition of all key terms important to the LSP’s and cargo owner’s understanding of the cargo insurance policy.     Why We Published the CARGO INSURANCE e-SSENTIALS e-Book At Roanoke we believe in the importance of simplifying the insurance process and educating our clients and partners about the insurance and surety products that impact their business and their customers.   About Roanoke Roanoke, a division of Roanoke Insurance Group Inc. and part of Munich Re Specialty Group Ltd., operates as a specialty insurance broker focused on surety and insurance solutions for logistics service providers, customs brokers and companies with supply chains.  We value our decades of partnership with the trade community as a trusted  provider of customs bonds, marine cargo insurance and ATA Carnets.  

Is It Time to Sharpen the Saw? Welcome to KnowledgePort

In 1963, John F. Kennedy said, “Leadership and learning are indispensable to each other.” Across the country, our team is there to listen, and you let us know what we can do to be a better partner and an asset to your team. To that end Roanoke’s staff of insurance, surety, and ATA Carnet experts are always learning and, in turn, hoping to impart our knowledge as well as our educational resources to you. Although we have offices throughout the country to serve you, these days we’re not able to see our clients as much as we want to. Shelter-in-place orders require that we all work from home. Now is a great time to focus on training and education, especially through online tools and interactive applications. Welcome to KnowledgePort™, our online learning management platform that we built specifically for our clients and partners. KnowledgePort™ provides training on insurance topics, risk mitigation and loss prevention strategies, surety bonds, and ATA Carnets. Through KnowledgePort™, Roanoke clients can learn the foundation of these topics via on-demand interactive courses and recorded webinars. The webinars, led by Roanoke professionals, are often co-hosted by partner companies such as logistics-focused law firms and consultants to bring the best minds together for you. Best of all, all courses are free to Roanoke clients, and most courses are eligible for NEI continuing education credits for CCS, CES, and MES designations. The current online course catalog consists of 18 modules. A few examples of highlighted courses include: ATA Carnet Fundamentals (Interactive Course): Clients will learn about the ATA Carnet document and the process of temporary importation, why the ATA Carnet is considered a passport for goods, what goods qualify, and which may be exempt from other government requirements. Also covered are the three types of temporary importation that fall under the ATA Carnet. Learn about best customs clearance practices — from mitigating claims to avoiding compliance red flags.   Cargo Insurance Basics (Interactive Course): Clients will gain a strong foundation in what cargo insurance is, how cargo insurance works, and the importance of the cargo owner insuring each and every shipment. You will be learn to explain to clients, how carriers limit liability, how insured value is calculated, and what happens in the event there is a loss to a cargo and a claim needs to be filed.   Can You Afford…
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Shipper & 3PL Contract Considerations | Roanoke

Last updated on May 20th, 2020Managing the Risk for Brokers and Shippers The Transportation Intermediaries Association (TIA) recently released a comprehensive whitepaper titled, “Shipper 3PL Contracts Considerations” as a guide to navigating contracts for its members. Our own Glenn Patton, VP Business Development and a board member of TIA contributed to the piece, and we are happy to be able to offer access to the whitepaper to our clients and partners as well.       It’s not uncommon for brokers and logistics service providers to be presented with contracts by their shipper clients. While every situation is different and should be managed on an individual basis, there are some general issues LSPs should consider when presented with contracts from clients. In best-case scenarios, good contracts are designed to protect both the shipper and the logistics service provider; however, there are instances where contracts are worded in a way that puts a lot of the legal responsibility on the LSP. At Roanoke, it’s our goal to act as a resource for shippers and brokers to ensure they are making the right decisions for their business and employees.     Third-Party Logistics Contract Considerations for Brokers   As a general rule of thumb, we suggest that logistics service providers never contractually agree to perform tasks that only the actual carrier or driver can accomplish. This puts an unnecessary risk on the LSP and opens them up to potential legal issues that are ultimately outside of their control.   Just some examples of this include:   • Dictating a driver’s route • Having a driver check-in throughout transit • Verifying equipment maintenance • Drug testing drivers • Changing the contract language to “shipper-carrier” • Auto liability requirements It’s recommended that logistics service providers carefully review all language in a contract presented by a shipper. If there are requests or requirements in the language that are too demanding for motor carriers, there is a good chance as a third party broker it will be difficult to find a compliant carrier.    Another common issue that logistics service providers should watch out for is any language in a 3PL contract that can make them legally responsible for the actions of the client or shipper. This can include anything from placing unlimited liability on the LSP to indemnifying them for shipper negligence.   Ultimately, contracts are a way for shippers and logistics service providers to clarify their roles and protect themselves throughout the transaction. It is in the best interest of both parties to carefully review all contracts with their attorneys and insurers before ever signing. Many insurance policies don’t…
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CBP Provides Details of Duty Deferral for COVID-19 Relief

Last updated on May 20th, 2020 Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic crisis, there have been shifting reports that the White House would impose temporary changes to duties, taxes and fees payment schedules in order to grant relief to importers. This past weekend, an Executive Order was issued that provides up to a 90-day duty postponement to qualified importers whose entries meet select conditions. The details of the CSMS message include: 1. The relief requires that importers seeking duty deferral be suffering “significant financial hardship.” This term is vague, but CBP provides guidance stating: “An importer will be considered to have a significant financial hardship if the operation of such importer is fully or partially suspended during March 2020 or April 2020 due to orders from a competent governmental authority limiting commerce, travel, or group meetings due to COVID-19, and as a result of such suspension, the gross receipts of such importer for March 13-31, 2020 or April 2020 are less than 60 percent of the gross receipts for the comparable period in 2019.” 2. Certain entries paid by one-time check, daily statement or Periodic Monthly Statement are eligible for the deferral. •  This includes formal entries of merchandise entered, or withdrawn from warehouse, for consumption (including entries for consumption from a Foreign Trade Zone). 3. Entries are not eligible for payment deferral if: •  Duties, Taxes and Fees have already been paid. •  Any line on the entry is subject to ADD/CVD. •  Any line on an entry is subject to Sections 201, 232 or 301 trade remedy tariffs. ° If an importer has a Section 232 or 301 approved exclusion prior to entry, the entry may be deferred if no other conditions apply (e.g. ADD/CVD). 4. Those importers who pay duty on period monthly statement have until 11:59 PM ET Monday, April 20th to amend their payment date for March entries. We encourage you to read the full CSMS 42423171 message for all relevant details including instructions on how to make payment. We also want to stress the importance of adhering to previous CBP instructions from CSMS 42421561 which emphasized that importers and CHBs should NOT prevent pending payment authorizations from occurring: “Any debit authorizations that have already been submitted to CBP will be sent for withdrawal on the regular schedule. Under certain conditions, if an importer or filer realizes…
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Employees Working Remotely? Step Up Your Cybersecurity

Last updated on May 20th, 2020The fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic in lost lives and economic disruption is tremendous. The pandemic has also caused unprecedented changes in the way we work. Many individuals throughout every sector of business are now working remotely. This includes the transportation sector, particularly as more state governments across the country impose stricter guidelines to stem the spread of the coronavirus. According to the National Customs Brokers and Forwarders Association of America (NCBFAA), customs broker and freight forwarder offices – large and small – throughout the United States are increasingly having employees work from home. The trade has shown confidence is the industry’s paperless environment, with the use of email, electronic data interchange (EDI) and blockchain, all of which enables documents to be scanned and transmitted securely online between parties. While it is tremendously positive for business that many of us are able to conduct work remotely, it’s important to remember that cyber criminals are looking to exploit an environment that falls outside of the usual boundaries of IT security.  With the increased use of personal internet service and personal devices that lack the accustomed level of security, a company’s IT infrastructure can be exposed to greater risks. Therefore, cybersecurity needs to be a top priority for every organization. This includes reviewing your data breach response plan to ensure it reflects remote workers. If your response plan or company policies and procedures don’t address remote work, now is the time to establish clear guidelines covering remote access to your company information systems and the use of personal devices. In addition, review your incident response plans to ensure your organization is prepared to respond to a data breach or security incident. Managers and all employees should also be familiar with applicable security guidelines, plans, and policies. Following are several measures you and your workers should be taking to mitigate the risk of a cyber breach while working remotely: • Safeguard all data related to confidential business information, trade secrets, protected intellectual property, work products, customer and employee information, and other personal information. • Provide remote cybersecurity awareness training, including on how employees can detect and handle phishing attacks and other forms of social engineering. Phishing and email scams are on the rise on the heels of the coronavirus. According to research from Barracuda Networks, the number of…
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